Muy Vs Mucho in Spanish

Muy Vs Mucho in Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
Learn how to use Muy Vs Mucho in SpanishWhen to use muy vs mucho in Spanish?. In the Spanish language "muy" is an adverb and always goes before adjectives and other adverbs, on the other hand, "mucho", "mucha", "muchos", "muchas", are adjectives and are placed before nouns, although there are some exceptions. I know that many of the students are hesitant to choose between:¿Marta es muy hermosa? or ¿Marta es mucho hermosa? (Marta is very beautiful?)¿Lucio es muy alto? or ¿Lucio es mucho alto? (Is Lucio very tall?)¿Pedro tiene muy dinero? or ¿Pedro tiene mucho dinero? (Does Pedro have a lot of money?)¿Matilde tiene muy que estudiar? or ¿Matilde tiene mucho que estudiar? (Does Matilde have a lot to study?)What is the difference between Muy and Mucho in Spanish?Knowing when to…
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La Leña vs Leño in Spanish

La Leña vs Leño in Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
Learn when to use La Leña vs Leño in Spanish What is the difference between la leña vs leño?. "La leña" and "el leño" both comes from the tree and therefore both are wood "madera".      Spanish Vocabulary:   leña - firewood leño - log of wood the wood - la madera the tree - el árbol   What is la leña?   "La leña" is a set of logs, branches, and pieces of wood "madera" used to make fire as fuel in a campfire, fireplace, heating, or similar uses.    "La leña" is the part of "el leño" that comes from trees or shrubs, of woody forests or agricultural plant species, which when cut up can be used for energy purposes.    For example:   Prepara la leña…
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Haber vs Tener in Spanish

Haber vs Tener in Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
How to use Haber Vs Tener in Spanish? How and when to use haber vs tener in Spanish?. The main difference between the verb to have "haber" and the verb to have " tener" is that haber is an auxiliary verb and tener is a main verb. This said, haber and tener are closely related, because in the Middle Ages they were basically synonymous, and haber was normally used where today would be used tener.  The current difference is established in the Golden Age. Tener originally meant to hold, a meaning that it still maintains, but it did not have the meaning of possession, which was exclusive of haber, but already from the first centuries of the literary language tener begins to invade the land. semantic of haber, and little…
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Naranja vs Anaranjado in Spanish

Naranja vs Anaranjado in Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
 When to use Naranja Vs Anaranjado? What is the difference between naranja vs anaranjado in Spanish?. Naranja or anaranjado are often used synonymously, although the color itself is "naranja". If something is "anaranjado" (or naranjado), it is that it has a color similar to that of "naranja" orange, or touches or shades of orange.    You can use "naranja" or "anaranjado" to refer to the color of something, they both mean "orange"   For example:  Tu vestido es naranja - Your dress is orange  Tu vestido es anaranjado - Your dress is orange    Here is the difference between naranja vs anaranjado in Spanish Now, specifically: When to use anaranjado? The "anaranjado" is used by the general when someone or something has the color on them.    For example:  Mi…
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Gusta vs Gustan in Spanish

Gusta vs Gustan in Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
When to use Gusta Vs Gustan in Spanish? When to choose: gusta vs gustan in Spanish?. Gusta (singular object) vs Gustan (plural object)    - The word "gusta" is singular, this applies when the subject is only one.   Examples:    A Marta le gusta su casa - Marta likes her house.  A mi me gusta ir al cine - I like to go to the movie theater A Mario le gusta cantar - Marios likes to sing A nosotros nos gusta conversar - We like to talk A ellos les gusta trabajar - They like to work   - The word "gustan" is plural. It refers to more than one subject.   How does this work? Gusta vs Gustan in Spanish Examples:    A los chicos les gustan los…
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Abuela vs Abuelita | Learn Spanish

Abuela vs Abuelita | Learn Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
What is the difference between abuela and abuelita? In this lesson you will learn the difference between abuela vs abuelita in Spanish. abuelita in Spanish = granny abuela in Spanish  = grandma Now, let's find out the difference between abuela vs abuelita in Spanish. Abuelita in Spanish "Abuelita" is the diminutive form of "abuela" Also "Abuelita" expresses love and affection. The term "Abuelita" is something mostly for children to say, although many of us continue to call  "abuelita"  to the "abuela" exceptional, affectionate, and who in our childhood gave us a lot of love and protection. Abuela in Spanish "Abuela" is your mother's mother or your father's mother. Also "Abuela" sounds more with a tone of respect and distance, with more formal settings, such as writing, people sometimes just say…
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Te Amo vs Quiero

Te Amo vs Quiero

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
Te Amo Vs Quiero | What is the difference between Te Amo and Te Quiero? Let's find out how and when to use  te amo vs te quiero. Amar verb : to love. Querer: verb:  to want, to love, to wish. When to use "te quiero"  The difference is very simple, although for many of us it is difficult to decipher it. You can say "te quiero" to everyone (mother, brothers, family, friends, girlfriend, pet), you can say "te quiero" to those for whom you feel affection.    "Te quiero" you can use to express affection, appreciation. But it also implies having certain proximity to the person. You also have an option to express affection with more distance and respect: "Te aprecio"  When to use "te amo" Is Te Amo…
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Pez vs Pescado | Learn Spanish

Pez vs Pescado | Learn Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
The Difference between Pez vs Pescado Pez and Pescado =  Fish Let's find out when to use pez vs pescado in Spanish. Pez in Spanish: Simple circulation aquatic vertebrate animal, provided with fins, with the body generally covered with scales, small laminae that protect it and help maintain its body temperature, which breathes through gills and reproduces through eggs. They breathe through a pair of gills that are found on their sides, through which they filter the air that is dissolved in the water. Some live in freshwater, others in saltwater, and others, such as silverside, mullet, salmon among others, can live in both areas, even the bull shark. Pescado in Spanish: A pescado is neither more nor less than a dead fish used for consumption, having been caught by…
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Señorita vs Señora | Learn Spanish

Señorita vs Señora | Learn Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
The difference between Señorita vs Señora Let's talk about when to use señorita vs señora in Spanish. It is time to distinguish when we use - señora - and when we should use - señorita in Spanish. Señora - Sra (Ms, Madam, Mrs) is used only for married women. The word Señorita (Miss) is traditionally used for a single woman. The terms madam and miss are all used as honorary titles for women.  the term señora can also be used as part of her and her husband's name, for example, Señor. and Señora. Johnson (Mr. and Mrs. Johnson) reflects respect and the meaning of union, marriage. The same happens when we speak of the profession, in this case, we use for example la doctora (the doctor) (Dra) or el doctor…
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Hacer vs Tener vs Estar in Spanish

Hacer vs Tener vs Estar in Spanish

Spanish Categories, This Vs That
Let's learn when to use hacer, tener and estar in Spanish (hacer vs tener vs estar). Hacer vs Tener vs Estar in Spanish When "estar" and "to be" do not mix. Except with certain expressions that are as follows: · tener sed = to be thirsty ·         tener hambre = to be hungry · tener calor = to be hot (person) ·         tener frío = to be cold (person) · hacer calor = to be hot (weather) · hacer frío = to be cold (weather) · hacer viento = to be windy (weather) ·         tener sueño = to be sleepy* Weather expressions that could be used with "estar" estar nublado/a - to be cloudy​ estar neblinoso/a - to be foggy estar lluvioso/a - to be rainy estar nevoso/a - to be snowy (weather; not “covered with snow”) Tip: You don’t say "estoy frío"  you say "tengo…
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